Toolkit Library/

Why we believe obvious untruths

Having the intellectual humility to recognize that we don’t know everything is a critical driver of truth-seeking. In this New York Times article, cognitive scientists and professors Philip Fernbach and Steven Sloman discuss their research showing that because individuals can only retain a limited amount of knowledge and develop expertise on a limited range of topics, our success as a species relies on the human ability to share knowledge through collaboration and social interaction. Principled Innovation asks us to work with others and recognize the limits of our own knowledge so that we can better understand and tackle the complex issues our communities face.

   Article

   10 minutes

   By: New York Times, Philip Fernbach and Steven Sloman

   K-12 educators | Lifelong learners


Making connections:

Principled Innovation asks us to work with others and recognize the limits of our own knowledge so that we can better understand and tackle the complex issues our communities face.

More on this topic:

Perspective taking for inclusion

  Article

  30 minutes

  By: Principled Innovation® (PI)

Is transparency good for business?

  Article

  10 minutes

  By: ASU, Center for Services Leadership

Evaluating quality of online information

  Article

  20 minutes

  By: Julie Cairo

Honesty or humility

  Video

  3 minutes

  By: Scale Architect

Using data in schools

  Article

  45 minutes

  By: Principled Innovation® (PI)

Access our collection of +200 learning materials

PI toolkit library